detract from something

deˈtract from sth | deˈtract sth from sth derived
(not used in the progressive tenses) to make sth seem less good or enjoyable

He was determined not to let anything detract from his enjoyment of the trip.

Main entry:detractderived

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • detract from — de ˈtract from [transitive] [present tense I/you/we/they detract from he/she/it detracts from present participle detracting from past tense detracted from …   Useful english dictionary

  • detract from — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms detract from : present tense I/you/we/they detract from he/she/it detracts from present participle detracting from past tense detracted from past participle detracted from detract from something to make… …   English dictionary

  • detract something from something — deˈtract from sth | deˈtract sth from sth derived (not used in the progressive tenses) to make sth seem less good or enjoyable Syn: take away from • He was determined not to let anything detract from his enjoyment of the trip. Main entry …   Useful english dictionary

  • take away from something — ˌtake aˈway from sth derived no passive to make the effort or value of sth seem less Syn: detract from • I don t want to take away from his achievements, but he couldn t have done it without my help. Main entry: ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • detract — de|tract [ dı trækt ] verb de tract from phrasal verb transitive detract from something to make something seem less good, attractive, or important: We should not allow her personal difficulties to detract from her public achievements …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • detract — ► VERB (detract from) ▪ cause (something) to seem less valuable or impressive. DERIVATIVES detraction noun. ORIGIN Latin detrahere draw away …   English terms dictionary

  • detract — de|tract [dıˈtrækt] v detract from [detract from sth] phr v [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: detractus, past participle of detrahere to take away ] to make something seem less good ▪ One mistake is not going to detract from your achievement …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • detract — verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin detractus, past participle of detrahere to pull down, disparage, from de + trahere to draw Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. archaic to speak ill of 2 …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • detract — verb detract from sth phrasal verb (transitive not in progressive) to make something seem less good than it really is: One mistake is not going to detract from your achievement. detraction noun (C, U) …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • detract — detract, distract Both words are used transitively (with an object) followed by from; but their meanings are different. Detract, which (more than distract) is also used without an object, means ‘to take away (a part of something), to diminish’: • …   Modern English usage

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